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Victoria Pynchon

As the co-founder of She Negotiates Consulting and Training, I offer my services as a keynote speaker, trainer and consultant....

She Mediates

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She Negotiates

She Negotiates

The 33 cent wage and income gap is unacceptable and unnecessary. So is the cliché glass ceiling. Bottom line, our...

Mediation Advocacy: How to Help Your Client Help You Help Him

Help me... help you. Help me, help you.  Jerry Mcguire

Two short-short stories.  Both to acquaint you with who I was as a litigator and how I can help you as a mediator.

A Born Moralist

I was on the telephone with my client talking about a Rand Corp. statistical study that was originally prepared as answers to contention interrogatories (!!) but eventually became the centerpiece of Plaintiff's proof that my client had engaged in a massive conspiracy to drive the Plaintiff out of business.  Claimed damages soaking wet:  $250 million.

I was talking about how wrong the opposition was on so many levels -- evidentiarily, practically, legally and, yes, morally.

My client said, "I've finally figured out what you are."

"Yes?"

"You, Vickie, are a born moralist."

And I took that to be a compliment. 

Anything You Can Get Away With

Toward the end of my career all my cases seemed to hover around the quarter-billion dollar mark.  This one was an environmental coverage suit for a major petroleum company's potential liablities for 500 + toxic waste sites in every Canadian province.  This is one of the few cases in which the insurance carrier can wear a "white hat."  My client -- Lloyds of London.

This stuff is complicated.  It involves coverage across a couple of decades and up the ladder of excess policies to the billion dollar mark.  We use "coverage charts" -- often color coded -- to understand the policy profile at a glance.

At every oral argument in the trial court -- up to the winning summary judgment motion -- I arrived with a clutch of color-coded coverage charts that  supported my client's position.  On every occasion, plaintiff's counsel complained about the charts.  But he never brought competing charts with him.  The Judge -- one of the best on the Superior Court bench -- really wanted to understand the issues and get it right.  So she spent each oral argument listening to both parties while scrutinizing my coverage charts.

I genuninely believe that this is why I won.

What Does This Have to Do with Mediation Advocacy? 

Two things.

First, if you believe in the very depths of your soul that your client is right -- as I always did -- your mediation advocacy will improve if you begin to understand the principles of mediation advocacy.  It's banal, already, to say that these principles are non-adversarial.  Yet few litigators are able to shift from a litigation to a mediation model in circumstances in which making the shift would dramatically improve their mediation outcome.     

Second, hellloooooooooooooooo!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  BRING VISUAL AIDS. 

Most attorneys are likely to settle this case at the mediation if they've brought the right stakeholders, properly prepared their strategic and tactical moves, and counseled their clients appropriately.  Yet they take their summary judgment briefs or demurrers or complaints, change the title to "Confidential Mediation Brief," make a few editorial changes -- primarily by removing references to the Judge granting their motion or providing them with relief -- send these briefs to the mediator, arrive with one (or more) bottom lines and, too often, a "prove you can settle this case" attitude toward the mediator.

This is not an indictment of the litigation bar nor even a complaint from a mediator.  This is the beginning of a series of posts about helping me help you help your client help you win the mediation.

Stay tuned.  Really.  Your mediation practice is about to go thermo-nuclear.  Take it from the "born moralist" who did whatever was (ethically) necessary to win.  Usually with pretty darn good results.

Comments (1)

Read through and enter the discussion by using the form at the end
Nancy E. Hudgins - February 28, 2008 2:51 AM

Vickie:
Visual aids--great idea! As a mediator, I would be thrilled to have parties bring visual aids. Mediators are people, too. If lawyers are providing clarity, they've just increased their credibility and reliability.
BTW, as a lawyer and advocate, I often wondered why lawyers don't put more graphs, charts, pictures into the briefs they file with the court. Word lets you import just about anything. I don't know where it's written that you can't take advantage of this technology in a pleading.
Nancy

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